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Cat Planet Fire Bar

Good afternoon/morning/whatever time it happens to be as you read this.
Jul 22 '14
Jul 22 '14
combustiblechole:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

I love the event model, I talk about it all the time!

combustiblechole:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

I love the event model, I talk about it all the time!

Jul 22 '14

(Source: skyreading)

Jul 22 '14

yannmmm:

The Hello Kitty macaroon I found in Hong Kong =^^=

Jul 22 '14

forest nymph

cutiecalliope:

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Jul 22 '14

wnderlst:

Aurora Borealis in Iceland | Maurice Lepetit
Jul 22 '14
christopherpoindexter:

Now for sale on Etsy: “The Universe and Her, and I #186” link to buy in bio. Much love!

christopherpoindexter:

Now for sale on Etsy: “The Universe and Her, and I #186” link to buy in bio. Much love!

Jul 20 '14
Steven Universe - Heaven Beetle (Reprise)

stevencrewniverse:

From composers Aivi & Surasshu:

"Heaven Beetle (Reprise)" from Giant Woman.

surasshu came up with the original Heaven Beetle theme, which plays when Steven, Pearl, and Amethyst journey to the Sky Spire. I arranged this version of his pretty song for the final scenes of the episode.

We love this shot of the Heaven Beetle’s room! Little beetle Sega Genesis, little beetle ceiling fan, little beetle succulent…

Music: Aivi & Surasshu
Art Direction: Kevin Dart
Design: Sam Bosma
Paint: Elle Michalka

(Source: waltzforluma / aivi & surasshu)

Jul 20 '14
wnderlst:

Ebenalp, Switzerland | Abinayan Parthiban

wnderlst:

Ebenalp, Switzerland | Abinayan Parthiban
Jul 20 '14

doktorvondoom:

  • Transformers: More Than Meets The Eye # 12

" Innermost energon. It’s the fuel around your spark casing. Everything else about you changes — bits gets replaced, upgraded, whatever — but your innermost energon stays there forever. Offering a portion to someone is very symbolic. Shows you care about them very much. “

Jul 20 '14

ca-tsuka:

moonanimate:

Enjoy. :)

"Moon Animate Make Up" = Sailor Moon episode 38 re-animated by over 200 fans from all around the world.

Jul 20 '14
Jul 20 '14

hotdogheroine50:

the moment you knew this was going to be the best fucking game you ever played

(Source: straighttohelvetica)

Jul 20 '14

People will stare. Make it worth their while → Basil Soda Haute Couture | F/W ‘12-‘13

Jul 20 '14

(Source: kodomomuke)